Georgia's Muses and Musings

I love acting. It is so much more real than life. Oscar Wilde

‘We are not nouns, we are verbs. I am not a thing - an actor, a writer - I am a person who does things - I write, I act - and I never know what I am going to do next. I think you can be imprisoned if you think of yourself as a noun.
Oscar Wilde
Posted 166 weeks ago
<p>July 2015 saw the birthing of a project that has been in my head for over a year. I am thrilled to announce my new podcast series “Secret Cities” for Touriocity has been released on <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/secret-cities-podcast/id1015905444?mt=2">i-Tunes</a>, <a href="http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/secret-cities">Stitcher</a> and <a href="https://soundcloud.com/secretcities">Sound Cloud</a>.</p><p>Founded by my friend Alex Grant, <a href="http://touriocity.com">Touriocity</a> is a unique start up in the travel business that enables you to create your own tour itineraries with the best guides out there. I started tour guiding in Rome back in 2009. A career highlight was taking HRH Prince Harry around in 2014. So I have a treasure trove of stories to share with you on these podcasts. The Secret City series is meant to introduce you to Rome and later other cities, give you some ideas as to what to see when you visit, and hopefully something to listen to as you pack your bags, or as you watch the sunset over the Gianicolo or when you’re home again, reminiscing about your adventures there. Please subscribe, have a listen, rate them and share them with friends, and book your own travel itinerary from Touriocity’s handpicked guides - the best of the best!</p><p>Thanks very much!</p><p>Georgia</p>

July 2015 saw the birthing of a project that has been in my head for over a year. I am thrilled to announce my new podcast series “Secret Cities” for Touriocity has been released on i-Tunes, Stitcher and Sound Cloud.

Founded by my friend Alex Grant, Touriocity is a unique start up in the travel business that enables you to create your own tour itineraries with the best guides out there. I started tour guiding in Rome back in 2009. A career highlight was taking HRH Prince Harry around in 2014. So I have a treasure trove of stories to share with you on these podcasts. The Secret City series is meant to introduce you to Rome and later other cities, give you some ideas as to what to see when you visit, and hopefully something to listen to as you pack your bags, or as you watch the sunset over the Gianicolo or when you’re home again, reminiscing about your adventures there. Please subscribe, have a listen, rate them and share them with friends, and book your own travel itinerary from Touriocity’s handpicked guides - the best of the best!

Thanks very much!

Georgia

Posted 170 weeks ago
<p>Announcing my new Podcast series Secret Cities for Touriocity! Tune in to iTunes, Sound Cloud or Stitcher. </p>

Announcing my new Podcast series Secret Cities for Touriocity! Tune in to iTunes, Sound Cloud or Stitcher. 

Posted 170 weeks ago
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Our Country’s Good

I saw my friend Doug’s mind blowing production of Our Country’s Good at the Teatro San Genesio in Rome a couple of years ago. The creme de la creme of Rome’s acting talent was on display, with some truly career best performances. It is a powerful, moving play that has stayed with me ever since. Timberlake Wertenbaker is a phenomenal playwright, a cousin of my godmother (not that I have met Timberlake… yet) and this is my favourite of her plays. 

I largely grew up in the Westcountry - my schools were in Dorset and Somerset and my grandparents’ farm in Devon was my retreat for exeat weekends and half terms. No voice reel of mine would be complete without a sample of a good bit o’ Devonshire. Ooh. I think I shall treat myself to a cream tea later today. 

Posted 196 weeks ago
<p>A lesser known painting by one of my favourite artists, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec. Made famous in popular culture by the movie Moulin Rouge, Lautrec was a central figure in the Bohemian, artistic world of fin de siecle Paris. From an aristocratic family, childhood polio crippled him and he always felt more at ease with outsiders and the lower classes. An impressionist with a difference, he  focussed much of his attention on depicting ‘behind the scenes’ highly intimate and profoundly personal portraits of Paris’s cabaret girls and prostitutes who let him in to their secret worlds, allowing him to view and paint the trusting, affectionate and sometimes sexual relationships they had with each other away from the lusty punters. For some reason, this scene of a dancer undressing is my favourite…. I love the sensuality of her back. I love that while we’re ' />

A lesser known painting by one of my favourite artists, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec. Made famous in popular culture by the movie Moulin Rouge, Lautrec was a central figure in the Bohemian, artistic world of fin de siecle Paris. From an aristocratic family, childhood polio crippled him and he always felt more at ease with outsiders and the lower classes. An impressionist with a difference, he  focussed much of his attention on depicting ‘behind the scenes’ highly intimate and profoundly personal portraits of Paris’s cabaret girls and prostitutes who let him in to their secret worlds, allowing him to view and paint the trusting, affectionate and sometimes sexual relationships they had with each other away from the lusty punters. For some reason, this scene of a dancer undressing is my favourite…. I love the sensuality of her back. I love that while we’re 'let in’ to her room to see the much shabbier reality of her personal life than her stage life, we can’t see her face. Yet her bare back and thrust out legs insinuate a sort of innocent, unknown eroticism. It’s a private moment in a her private world. I also love the blues and greys of her skirts contrasted with the vivid, shocking, browny red of her hair. It seems to mimic the paradox of her personal vulnerability with the brassy bright lights of her profession. I’m also always lost in Toulouse Lautrec’s unique, whimsical brush work. Despite our looking on, she is still private. Her soul protected from the voyeur’s hungry gaze. I have this painting in my room (a poster of it - one day I aim to own the original…!) One friend came over for tea and a photo shoot a while ago and said 'she looks like you’. It hadn’t crossed my mind .. but… Same hair, back and arms…same profession, minus the sex. Perhaps that’s why I like her so much! 

Posted 198 weeks ago
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Commercial Voice Overs. Last year my good friend Mike Connaris founder of MCASSO music encouraged me to put a voice over reel together. Mike has directed and composed the music for countless radio commercials and he picked out the handful you can hear on this little post, which were recorded in his studio on Carnaby Street. Mike convinced me I should fully embrace the somewhat husky timbre of my voice and emphatically exploit my extremely posh vowels… the resulting combination of which is this Commercial reel. My favourite is Weight Watchers (third one in). I play it before my lunch of crisp, golden potato wedges every day.

Posted 198 weeks ago
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The Secret Garden.

As a little girl I adored this book and was given the audio tape to take with me to boarding school from Germany, aged 9. I listened to it every night as I battled my homesickness… transported to the Yorkshire moors, imagining myself to be the romantic, crotchety, orphaned Mary Lennox alone at Mistlethwaite Manor. That I spent some of my childhood in India, I felt, justified my imaginings. So absorbed in this flight of fantasy did I become, that I once approached the headmaster in his study, and asked if I might “have just a little bit of garden to call my very own”. To his eternal credit, he kept a completely straight face and asked the head gardener to give me some tools and seeds and a patch of earth in the rose garden. The fad lasted for about a fortnight, and I have not yet regained my green fingers. I have, however, befriended the robin red breast that visits my garden every morning for his crumbs. 

Posted 199 weeks ago
<p>Newest head shot from LA</p>

Newest head shot from LA

Posted 253 weeks ago
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.
Theodore Roosevelt
Posted 305 weeks ago

A FoCing Good Party...

Festivity of Creativity - or FoC - happens every Wednesday night at The Room Gallery, in central Rome. It’s a night to celebrate creative endeavour, appreciate artists on the stage, on the wall, on the microphone, on film…. comics, raconteurs, musicians, singers, actors, architects, photographers and performers of every sort. Everyone is welcome, spectators, performers, or those who have not much else to do on a midweek evening and might be curious! The more the merrier. 

It’s a challenge to research or write, then prepare, rehearse and perform something every week… but then that’s the name of the game isn’t it? As artists we need to put ourselves, our work, our souls “out there” - it’s the terrifying bit about it all. Because if we don’t no one will see it, we’ll have no, or little incentive, to create at all; and we won’t do it. We’ve all been there. We know that, in theory, not being ‘proactive’ about your artistic career means that, actually, you’re pretty much petrified out of your wits… not, as all blocked people will tell us… Lazy. Julia Cameron writes perceptively about blocked creatives being afraid, not lazy. She also writes about the stultifyingly poisonous and paralysing effects of “Perfectionism”. That ole devil on my shoulder. Yours too? I don’t wonder. Because when we “put it out there” (for 'it’ fill in the blank.. art, painting, performance, writing, poetry, pottery, jokes, music, films… ad infinitum) you’re setting yourself up for a fall, for ridicule, for failure. Aren’t you. 

Actually probably not. Actually - you’re probably going to inspire admiration at the very very least - for giving it a go, when those observing perhaps haven’t, given 'it’ a go - and perhaps secretly long to themselves. And the point is… you might fail. We all might fail at anything we try. So. We try again. The point is; we try. We don’t do nothing, despite our crippling fears about opening up vulnerable parts of ourselves. And if we fail, we learn. And try again. The great thing about The Room is - we’re all creative beings. And we’re all friendly, and supportive, and admiring. And there to laugh away the shameful dropped lined, missed dance move, smudged painting, trite first poem…  (er.. yes.. I’m talking from experience).

To do a show of some sort every week probably means we won’t get it TOTALLY perfect.. it's not meant to be. See my earlier blog about the film collective last year. It’s about practising and flexing our creative muscles; putting 'it’ out there; creating our own work when there’s a recession on and there’s little professional work to be got… keeping in practice… honing our skills… developing our confidence… putting on a jolly good show, glorious hiccups & forgotten lines & flaws and all. And having a Marvellous Party too! With a little help from our good friend Bacchus of course. 

Art is not the reserve of loners and dysfunctional wrecks. The Room is a sacred family of artistically energetic people, who love a cracking party too. So come along to Via Cairoli on a Wednesday night - email me suggestions for what you’d like to see performed, or even better, what you’d like to perform yourself. It’ll be a FoCing good party. 

Posted 305 weeks ago